Thursday, February 28, 2008

Trouble by Gary Schmidt


"Henry Smith's Father told him that if you build your house far enough away from Trouble, then Trouble never find you."

The CIP summary is hidden to prevent possible spoilers. If you'd like to read this brief summary, just highlight it using your cursor and it will magically appear in the following lines.

CIP Summary: Fourteen-year-old Henry, wishing to honor his brother Franklin's dying wish, sets out to hike Maine's Mount Katahdin with his best friend and dog, but fate adds another companion - the Cambodian refugee accused of fatally injuring Franklin - and reveals troubles that predate the accident.

Publisher: Clarion Books; 304 pages





(Alternate spellings of this award include: Newberry, Newbury, & Newbary)

16 comments:

Mary Voors said...

This book will be published in April, and I don't have my hot little hands on even a review copy of it yet, so (unfortunately) I can't post the first line or summary.

Trouble was suggested for inclusion on our list by Susan. You can read a post she wrote about the book at http://wizardswireless.blogspot.com/2008/01/trouble.html

It sounds like a book we all might want to read! I will post the first line and summary as soon as I get the book.

Nan Hoekstra said...

first line -
Henry Smith's father told him that if you build your house far enough away from Trouble, then Trouble will never find you.
See the full excerpt at
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?isbn=0618927662

Mary said...

Nan-

Thanks for the first line; I've just posted it to the blog. I've also managed to get my hands on an Advance Reader's Copy of this title. I have barely begun, but am already captured by the style of writing and characters. I can't wait to finish it!

Mary said...

Earlier, I said that this was a book "we all might want to read" based on the post at the wizardswireless blog. Having finished this title, let me amend that comment... you will be missing out if you don't read this title.

Kris said...

I couldn't wait to read this -- I so loved The Wednesday Wars and Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy. This one, however, didn't affect me as strongly as Gary Schmidt's other work -- it was good, but I got the feeling that he was trying to do "too much" with this one. There are so many different plots and subplots within this story, it was hard for me to focus (or care) very much about any one thing.

Heather said...

Wow! I found all of the twists and subplots intriguing. I could NOT PUT THIS BOOK DOWN. Schmidt kept things just enough of a mystery (who was driving was a surprise to me) and he tied every little thing together beautifully without making everything too neat (or going into too much detail)in the end. Bravo!

Jen said...

I love a book that keeps me guessing.

Janet said...

Does this book remind you of Matthew 7:24-25? "Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock."

You get such great insight into real family struggles in this book. While Dad is trying to do everything "right", he eventually realizes many things are wrong. But it is Henry who figures it out -- you don't build your house away from trouble, you build your house in a manner to deal with trouble, because trouble is inevitable.

I also liked that the spectators in this story thought they knew the whole story of the accident. (Again, so much like real life.) They did not, and we the readers do not know either. I thought I had it all figured out by page 72, but this book needs to be read all the way to the end.

diannaburt said...

Well, honestly, I am so tired of 'teen' angst books and the character is 14, but I read the comments in the blog and thought I'd try it. And I am soooo in the column of people who couldn't put it down. I thought I had it all figured out too, very early, but I was surprised. And I was surprised in a good way! I loved this book. Gary Schmidt has two honors under his belt, and - so far, I'll be voting for "Trouble" come January. I loved the twists and turns and very rarely does a book keep me up so that I have to read it, but this one did.

Anonymous said...

The Wednesday Wars was my favorite book last year, so I had high expectations for Trouble also. It is a remarkable story and well written, but it did not impact me in the same way as The Wednesday Wars. As remarkable as it is, I don't know if it is Newbery-worthy. Definitely recommended reading, though.

Teresa said...

This is a work that I easily see being a discussion companion with A Separate Peace or To Kill A Mockingbird or Lord of the Flies.

A story of interconnectedness and prejudice and redemption that, while on the upper end of Newbery, seems to fit the criteria quite well.

Clare said...

I loved this book! So many surprises! So many unexpected connections! A very good lesson in "perceptions".

Lisa said...

I was so impressed by this beautiful book. The story was absorbing, though full of twists and surprises it was not at all forced. The characters were the shining jewel - the pain and conflict in each was almost tangible. This is certainly one of my top picks of the year.

kayaklibrarian said...

Simply the best book I have read this year. Beautiful, insightful.
Should be a required read for 5th and 6th graders.

Kayakgirl said...

This is the best book of the year, no doubt. Heavy reading, but a beautiful story. I will have to get my own copy, so I can underline the many fantastic insights. I have told my students about this book, but only suggest this book for good readers.
I think it would be a great book for 5th or 6th grade teachers to read aloud.

Jill said...

Wow! What a powerful book. So much going on, it was a guessing game until the end. Great book, very heavy though.