Monday, May 4, 2009

Wild Things by Clay Carmichael


"Humans were diggers and buriers, the cat thought, like dogs."

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Abstract: Stubborn, self-reliant, eleven-year-old Zoe, recently orphaned, moves to the country to live with her prickly half-uncle, a famous doctor and sculptor, and together they learn about trust and the strength of family.

Publisher: Front Street; 240 pages

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Absolutely wonderful book; characters with a depth rarely found in children's literature and a touching story that appeals to children and adults alike.

Clare said...

I agree, I thought the story in the book was wonderful. It is definitely one of my favorites thus far.

Jill said...

This has fast become my favorite book that I have read so far. I loved the way that Carmichael created Zoe and Henry's relationship. What a great way for the two of them to find a real love. The supporting characters were great as well, and the little twist at the end with Wil added a little to the story, although I still would have loved the book without even mention of Wil. Great book, great read!

Anonymous said...

I was captivated by the characters in this book. They were written about so well I felt that I knew them. I loved Zoe's character! Such an adventurous spirit, and closeness with her surroundings is inspiring.

Kris said...

Absolutely beautiful! I just finished it, and I'll be re-reading it tonight when I get home, savoring every minute. This tops my list for now.

kim said...

I liked this book, but it is not one of my favorites. I felt the characters were exaggerated characters of themselves! The dialogue just did not ring true for me. I did like the story and would love to have seen it done in more capable hands.

Jen said...

This story reminded me of how I felt when I read Tender Morsels by Lanagan. I was intrigued by the bonds that connected characters to each other. The characters themselves were well drawn, sympathetic characters. And I thought the added perspective of the cat gave us a fascinating angle. Well done, Clay Carmichael.