Monday, June 1, 2009

Emmaline and the Bunny by Katherine Hannigan

"Emmaline wanted a bunny."

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Abstract: Everyone and everything in the town of Neatasapin is tidy, except Emmaline who likes to dig dirt and jump in puddles, and wants to adopt an untidy bunny.

Publisher: Harper Collins; 94 pages

7 comments:

DaNae said...

I can't even convy the amount of dissapointment I had in this book. I read it to several classes of 1st graders and honestly felt like I was patronizing them.

Anonymous said...

Ouch! So sorry you felt that way about this rich and layered book. I teach first grade and I don't think that I would use it as a read aloud because the language and the concepts are so far above most of my students. Obviously we read very different books because this one very much belongs on a Mock Newbery list.

Jill said...

I would have to agree with DaNae. I was disappointed in this book as well. I do not think it is Newbery award worthy, in my opinion, but it did have its good points. I truly enjoyed the alliteration and play on words that Hannigan used throughout the book...it was my favorite part of the book.

Jacquie said...

I agree; the alliteration and play on words were just plain fun! I handed it over to my almost-fourteen-year-old daughter, and she enjoyed the cuteness, too.

Dawn said...

It was a little too syrupy for my taste. The language that was meant to sound lilting and sweet seemed cumbersome in print. I might have enjoyed it better if the author had just told it to me - which from her note seems like where the story might have originated.

Jen said...

I liked the lyrical language and the way the premise was proved with both word and pictures. It worked for me. Both of our kids enjoyed it as well, but are young and didn't seem to 'get' the big picture.

IdaB said...

I also love the lyrical language.
A sweet underlying lesson about taking care of our world, which some children may not see. Beautifully done.